Journal of a Journalist

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Posts tagged history

19 notes

Consider today’s online world. The Usenet, a worldwide bulletin board, allows anyone to post messages across the nation. Your word gets out, leapfrogging editors and publishers. Every voice can be heard cheaply and instantly. The result? Every voice is heard. The cacophany more closely resembles citizens band radio, complete with handles, harrasment, and anonymous threats. When most everyone shouts, few listen. How about electronic publishing? Try reading a book on disc. At best, it’s an unpleasant chore: the myopic glow of a clunky computer replaces the friendly pages of a book. And you can’t tote that laptop to the beach. Yet Nicholas Negroponte, director of the MIT Media Lab, predicts that we’ll soon buy books and newspapers straight over the Intenet. Uh, sure.
Clifford Stoll: Why Web Won’t Be Nirvana (1995)

Filed under history tech

3 notes

The SDS carried on its undercover activities against any organizations that they believed threatened Britain’s social order. This include animal rights organizations, unions, and anti-Nazi, and anti-racism groups. They were also allegedly involved in the planting incendiary devices at branches of department store Debenhams in Luton, Harrow and Romford in 1987; and one member was later involved in writing the pamphlet that led to the famous “McLibel” trial of the 1990s. The workings of the SDS were on a “need to know basis,” and only a handful of police knew exactly what this little club were up to. But their presence fueled genuine fears amongst the British Establishment that there were “Reds under the beds,” and that revolution was a literal stone’s throw away. This was all going on behind-the-scenes, while out front, muppets like the councillors and journalists lined-up on this program, pushed the hysteria of Punk Rock riots and civil disobedience, that reflected the very genuine fears at the heart of the UK Establishment. (Note London councillor Bernard Brook-Partridge mention of “MI5 blacklists.”) So, that’s the background to this fascinating archive of the year that politicians (and even the BBC) thought Punk Rock was a torch-bearer for bloody revolution.
Dangerous Minds | Anarchy in the UK (for real): British establishment’s fear of an ACTUAL punk rock revolution, 1977

Filed under history britain punk

21 notes

One thing everyone can agree on is that Isaac Newton’s mind was shaped by his miserable childhood. He was born in 1642, into a prosperous farming family in Lincolnshire, but his father was already dead, and his mother had other things on her mind besides her son. Young Isaac found consolation wherever he could: he dreamed of killing his mother, and burning the house down around her, and he took revenge on the other boys at Grantham grammar school by doing better at lessons than them. His mother wanted him to become a farmer, but he defied her by getting a scholarship to Trinity College, Cambridge at the age of 18. He remained surly and solitary throughout his four undergraduate years, and insisted on reading modern authors like Descartes rather than the Aristotelians he was supposed to be studying. He was befriended by an enlightened professor of mathematics, Isaac Barrow, but showed no signs of intellectual distinction, and when the university was closed in 1665 – on account of the Great Plague – he had no choice but to slink back to his mother’s house. He was still refusing to take any interest in farming, and devoted his next two years to making notes on everything he saw and messing around with glass prisms in darkened rooms.
Jonathan Rée reviews ‘Newton and the Origin of Civilisation’ by Jed Buchwald and Mordechai Feingold · LRB 10 October 2013

Filed under science history

20 notes

whykoshertacos:

http://www.kvia.com/news/kosher-taco-truck-highlights-crypto-jew-history/-/391068/21119168/-/h3cqrr/-/index.html

ABC 7

Kosher taco truck highlights crypto-Jewish history

An El Paso artist hopes to highlight the history of crypto-Jews in the Southwest through a kosher taco truck.

About six years ago, artist Peter Svarzbein started photographing crypto-Jews, Hispanic or Latinos of Jewish descent who had to keep their faith a secret after the Spanish inquisition, and their descendents.

Svarzbein wants to show the stories of those families through his taco truck, which was serving the fusion food at Congregation B’nai Zion and Hope and Anchor over the weekend.

On Monday, the truck was at the Foodville food truck spot in Downtown El Paso, on the corner of Mills and Mesa. Along with serving up tacos, the stories of crypto-Jews are projected on walls….

Just learned about this amazing Texan history art-and-food project about the Crypto-Jews. Sounds delicious and (crap) educational.

Filed under food history texas jewish art

2,368 notes

inothernews:

poynterinstitute:

webbys:

In 1991, the first Webcam is invented in the Cambridge University Computer Lab, allowing users to check coffee pot levels without moving.  
Their laziness was technology’s gain. 
Explore the best of Internet history. 

Coffee and the internet: a dynamic duo and source of inspiration to journalists everywhere. 

I can’t tell if it’s this or the first cell phone call that is the bigger tech achievement now.

Coffee - fueling journalism and the internet.

inothernews:

poynterinstitute:

webbys:

In 1991, the first Webcam is invented in the Cambridge University Computer Lab, allowing users to check coffee pot levels without moving.  

Their laziness was technology’s gain. 

Explore the best of Internet history

Coffee and the internet: a dynamic duo and source of inspiration to journalists everywhere. 

I can’t tell if it’s this or the first cell phone call that is the bigger tech achievement now.

Coffee - fueling journalism and the internet.

Filed under coffee history tech